Miguel Watson, who is being raised by his mother who is visually impaired, doesn’t have the best grades in academics, but his spirit of perseverance is nothing short of brilliance.

Despite having to grapple with failure at times, he always tries to bounce back especially when he considers his mother’s struggle.

He did just that last year when he sat six CSEC subjects, administered by the Caribbean Examination Council (CXC). He failed three.

“When I failed last year, I was really down and feeling depressed and stuff like that,” he told The Beacon. “But I motivated myself and decided to try again.”

Miguel, who attended Enid Bennett High School at Bog Walk in St. Catherine, repeated fifth form and sat four CSEC subjects.

He passed three, bringing his total number of subjects up to six.

They are Physical Education, Principles of Business, Social Studies, Human and Social Biology, Agricultural Science, and English A.

“When I saw that I got three more subjects yesterday, I felt like a burden lifted off my shoulder because I was worrying and wondering about the results,” Miguel said. “What I did [this time round] was to get the past papers, mark down all the repeated questions, practiced them and stuff like that.”

The resident of Top Jackson district in the Bog Walk area is now on the verge of applying to join the Jamaica Constabulary Force.

“Probably I can help out my mom some day soon,” he noted.

Miguel explained that his initial goal was to become an agricultural extension officer, who essentially educates farmers about best practices. However, he changed that goal due to financial constraints, he said.

Miguel, who disclosed that he only recently developed a relationship with his father, lauded his teachers and other people who helped him.

“I barely mange sometimes because my mother can hardly find it for all of us, but it works,” he commented.

His mother, Josephine Reid, has five children.

Miguel, the third child, said he is the first to complete high school and to sit CXC subjects. His smaller brother is in primary school.

Their mother told The Beacon that she has never seen her three last children, adding that she was barely able to see the first two.

“But based on what people say, Miguel don’t ugly,” she commented. “Him don’t give no trouble. Him love church and is like a drama man. When yuh feel down and him come in the house, him just lift yuh spirit.”

She stated that, when Miguel informed her about now having six subjects, she was thrilled.

“I am proud of him; it comes like a burden come off mi,” the mother declared, adding that she tries to be the best version of herself for her children despite being blind.

“When mi just lost the sight, mi feel a way, but mi nuh mek anything bother mi again,” she further said. “Mi can wash; mi can tidy the house; and mi can duh other things fi miself.”

Miguel, in the meantime, encouraged his peers and others to never give up, and to use failure as a stepping stone.

“Do not throw in the towel, because your breakthrough may just be around the corner,” the 18-year-old further advised.


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