A mother was among people who wept yesterday at the burial of her only child, Favion McLeod, also called Flat Bush and Star Boy.

The 40-year-old party promoter, business operator and homeowner was gunned down in broad daylight on January 6 at his native Magazine Lane in Bog Walk, St. Catherine.

Reports are that he was waiting to be picked up to attend a party, which was being hosted by one of his cousins. A gunman, who is yet to be apprehended, appeared in a motorcar and shot McLeod multiple times. He got the fatal blow to the head. Speculation is rife that the incident may have been a contract killing.

In light of the homicide, police officers and soldiers kept a close watch yesterday as members of the local entertainment fraternity, vendors, residents of Magazine Lane, and others attended the burial at McLeod’s family plot along Bog Walk Bypass.

Many people, like McLeod’s corpse, were decked out in red outfits.

McLeod, who was a fashion enthusiast, was dressed in black pants, red and white shirt, and a red blazer with perfectly matching accessories – a gold chain, red cap, darkers, red handkerchief and a gold watch. His glass-top casket, coloured in glossy red, had his ‘Flat Bush’ alias emblazoned on it.

The eye-catching presentation of the body perhaps made up for aspects of the proceedings, which were scaled down significantly due to national restrictions. The restrictions were imposed to fight the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

McLeod’s ex-girlfriend, Kerryann Johnson, in presenting the eulogy, said her child’s late father attended Tulloch Primary School and Enid Bennett High in Bog Walk.

He was the first of seven children for his late father Beresford McLeod, and the only child for his mother Ivy Garricks.

Johnson told the gathering: “After leaving high school, his mother gave him his first start with a box of shoes where he went ahead and started selling at the Ocho Rios Market [in St. Ann]. After adopting his party life, his business failed.

“His mother assisted him again – this time with clothes that he sold in the Linstead Market. Known for his continuous party life with the Flat Bush Crew, the business failed once more. He wasn’t discouraged at all. He started selling shoes for his cousin Easton – also known as ‘Red Rat’, in the Linstead Market.”

Johnson said she and McLeod eventually started a relationship and, after two years together, they produced McLeod’s first child – Arianna, who is now nine years old.

The couple started to operate a bar and wholesale in their hometown.

Johnson noted: “Still owning and operating his business and working for his cousin, he (McLeod) was still a party animal. He decided that he wanted to become a [party] promoter and create a brand for himself. He is known for the huge party – Star Boy, Black and Red Edition.”

Johnson and McLeod eventually separated.

He entered another relationship, which produced his second child – Mia, now age four.

McLeod, who continued to sell goods in Linstead Market, went on to build a house and purchase a motor car.

Johnson said: “Still selling in the market for his honest living [and] providing for his mother and children, Mr. McLeod was very confident with pursuing his dreams. One of his dreams was to build his house. He started it in 2018 and completed in 2020. He also wanted to own a nice car, and that was accomplished.

“While still selling in the market, his mother became sick and, [amid] the pandemic that our country experienced, he (McLeod) decided to leave the market and start his own business again – a bar and a liquor wholesale,” Johnson further said.

She added that McLeod loved his family. “Mr. McLeod had endless love for his mother and children – and it was evident. He didn’t miss that special moment of their life. Every year, he always throws a party for their birthdays. His mother’s ailment took a toll on him physically and emotionally. He cried tears.”

Johnson described McLeod’s last moment with his mother.

“On the 6th of January 2021, he (McLeod) washed his clothes and cleaned his house, bought a box lunch and ate it with his mother. He took a shower, dressed up as usual, and told his mother that he would soon return home.

“Mr. McLeod was gunned down in his hometown and his life was cut short – a day, a month, a year, a time we will never forget… Don’t think of him as gone; his journey just began. Life holds so many facets [and] this earth is only one. Just think of him as resting from the sorrows and the tears…” Johnson further told mourners.

Following the tribute, it was time for McLeod to be placed into the grave.

“Nuh man nuh fi put him in deh,” a woman shouted militantly.

Responding to the shout, the male pall bearers stayed at bay and allowed women to take the casket about five footsteps away to McLeod’s resting place – a grave painted white.

During interment, the weeping mother of the deceased rushed from the outskirts of the burial ground.

She threw herself on top of the casket.

“Favion, a yuh one [mi have]; yuh tek care a mi,” she bawled.

“Favion gone lef mi!”


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By Mills