Cynthia Robinson, affectionately called Miss Cynthia, who was revered mainly for her exceptional cooking skills and unflinching generosity, has completed her earthly sojourn.

She passed away on 5 May 2021, about 6:45AM, at her Royal Avenue home in her native Linstead, St. Catherine.

She was 81.

Miss Cynthia lived at different locations in Linstead – initially at Hope View Avenue, and subsequently at Trafalgar Street, Fletcher’s Avenue, and Royal Avenue.

In pursuit of an education during childhood, she enrolled at the then Linstead Elementary School, which was located where Linstead Health Centre now stands.

After leaving school, Miss Cynthia went on a remarkably industrious journey to earn an honest living.

That journey, at one point, took her into the employ of Qualitexx – a laundromat that was on Linstead’s King Street, at the location where the old library once was based.

For decades, Miss Cynthia also put her entrepreneurial prowess on show at different locations in Linstead.

She sold snacks, biscuits and other such treats outside Linstead courthouse, and beside a relatively large ackee tree where Banbury Taxi Stand is located in Linstead.

Miss Cynthia, who worked in the canteen at Linstead Police Station for years, eventually started her own cooking business.

She sold cooked meals and other food items from her home on Fletcher’s Avenue, in the area where Debbie’s Meat Shop is now located – not far from Linstead Post Office.

Living on Fletcher’s Avenue, Miss Cynthia was only a few steps away from the bustling Linstead Market.

Her home eventually became somewhat of a store-room for several vendors, who could not be bothered with the task of frequently taking their goods home.

Miss Cynthia’s home, regardless of address, was also a refuge especially for children, including those she adopted.

She gave birth to seven.

One of Miss Cynthia’s 11 grandchildren, Orlando Givans, who was raised by the late matriarch, told The Beacon that his grandmother was nothing short of phenomenal.

“My grandmother was a very creative, industrious and phenomenon woman who fed thousands in Linstead,” he commented. “She was a woman of dignity, highly loved and respected. She was a strong woman of God.”

Amid the elation and benevolence, Miss Cynthia also had her share of dark moments.

In one such moment, one of her sons, Joel Palmer, also called ‘Mash Bakkle’, was shot dead during political violence in Kingston in 1980.

Nineteen years ago, Miss Cynthia faced another massive battle when she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Born 11 March 1940, Miss Cynthia maintained a pleasing countenance and gentle spirit to the very end.

She, indeed, will be missed.


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By Mills