Natalie Hutchinson (centre) along with her son Swayne Sullivan (left) and friend Lionel Shaw. Jamaica Beacon photos

After having to pull down a house she built recently for Natalie Hutchinson and her six under-aged children at Linstead in St. Catherine, philanthropist Rebecca Stewart is now rebuilding the structure – and more.

She is expanding the project to benefit two other persons in need of housing. Those persons are Hutchinson’s adult son Swayne Sullivan who has been displaced, and her amputated friend Lionel Shaw who lives in a shack along the main road near Vanity Fair bridge in Linstead.

The philanthropist, Stewart, initially built a wooden house late last year for Hutchinson and her under-age children in the vicinity of Linstead Fire Station.

Shortly after Hutchinson moved into the building, she was served a notice to vacate the property, which rightfully is owned by a public entity dubbed NROCC. The family occupied the land illegally.

After pulling down the house, Stewart leased property elsewhere in Linstead – York Street, to be exact.

“I leased the land for two years, paying $13,000 a year,” she disclosed.

She added that the new house being built for Hutchinson and her under-aged children will be more convenient, considering that it will have partitions.

“I said [to the builders], ‘Give Ms Natalie a bigger place [than I previously donated]. Part it off and give the [three] girls their room; give the [three] boys their room; give Ms Natalie her room,” added Stewart, a Trinidadian native who also heads a church in the United States.

She yesterday stated that the foundation for Hutchinson’s house is already complete.

Hutchinson, in the meantime, expressed gratitude that Stewart is not only rebuilding the house for her, but is also extending her generosity to two other adults, including Sullivan who was forced to remove the wooden house he had built on the illegally occupied land.

Hutchinson also noted that, if she has a house, she would stand a better chance of getting back her six children and a grand-daughter whom the government took into State care last year after notices were served for the family to leave the land where they were living.

“I feel good because I want somewhere to live and come outa people house [where I am staying temporarily] to get back mi children to stay with them again,” added Hutchinson, who told The Beacon she is now staying with a family friend.

The philanthropist, Stewart, in the meantime, said she is happy to assist people in Jamaica with furnished houses although she does not have a house for herself in the United States.

“I don’t own a house yet; I pay rent, but yet I am building houses for people, leaving myself and my family undone,” she said while chiding the Jamaican government for not doing enough to help people in dire need of housing.

“When I see some conditions that people live in Jamaica, I wouldn’t put mi dog in some of the houses – well, dem not houses…” she lamented. “What is the government doing for its people?” Stewart asked.

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